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by Mariah Robinson

Ann Cabot, upscale art gallery owner, is struggling to find a pathway to lasting happiness while coping with the sorrows of relinquished love. There is George, her kind but stifling boyfriend, and Max, her intelligent but corrosive ex-husband.

Enter the Pied Piper—Maggie Lambert—Ann’s newly commissioned and exquisitely gifted art conservator. Charismatic, enigmatic, and abrasively tough-minded, Maggie awakens something foreign and insistent in Ann that promises a new freedom.

Deeply wise and deftly written, Sister Sorrow, Sister Joy is about the risks of love—with all its joy, sorrow, and uncertainty.

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Meet the Author

Mariah Robinson lives in Richmond, Virginia. Her first novel, Love and Other Illusions, was nominated for Best in Literary Fiction by The Library of Virginia.

Press Kit

Details

Formats:  Paperback, Hardcover

Pages:  286

ISBN PB: 978-1-9399309-9-6

Release Date: 11/20/2017

Praise

“A compelling novel—every word and scene carefully chosen. I love the Richmond connection!” —John Sheriden Ashworth, M.D.

“With skillful dialogue, a wealth of Richmond locations (including some long-gone and greatly lamented restaurants), and a storyline that vibrates with external and internal conflict, Robinson creates a novel at once wise and witty.” —Jay Strafford, retired writer and editor, Richmond Times-Dispatch

“In this novel, Mariah Robinson demonstrates her sharply perceptive social observation. Anyone curious about how Richmonders at the top spend money and time will especially enjoy Ann’s company.” —Walter Coppedge, Professor Emeritus at Virginia Commonwealth University

“This was a unique reading experience, and I quite enjoyed it. Every verbal communication of every character in this book has the ring of authenticity. The skill of writing conversation is one I much admire. Mariah Robinson has written a book that challenges the mind and charms the heart.” —Wallace Saval, former Superintendent, Petersburg Schools; current Professor of History, Virginia State University

“A wonderfully written and sophisticated story about an accomplished woman rediscovering her independence, Sister Sorrow, Sister Joy is well worth the time.” —Walter Maxwell Dotts III, Richmond, Virginia

“Wonderful read! I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It was a fresh departure from the usual love story, and I was sad to turn the final page. I am hoping for a sequel.” —Carol Hofer, owner, The Chiffarobe Antiques and Gifts

“I very much enjoyed the author’s well-written dialogue, cultural references, and sensitive description of complex emotions.” —Geraldine Duskin, owner, Ghostprint Gallery

“The multifaceted main character study is one of the joys of the book. The book takes place in various locations, particularly in and around Richmond and Hampton, Virginia, and jetting off to Ireland and Portofino moves the story to enchanting locations. Sister Sorrow, Sister Joy is a truly enjoyable read of a complex character in a fast-moving story.” —Wade Ogg, Richmond, Virginia

“Set in the intriguing gallery world of historic Richmond and the natural beauty of Virginia’s Hampton River Shore, Sister Sorrow, Sister Joy explores six crucial months in the life of gallery owner Ann Cabot in 1987. Critical choices predominate as Ann seeks to chart her course. Longing to define herself and comprehend her quest for love and meaning, Ann encounters more questions than answers. Her ex-husband, Max; her sometimes-lover, George; and two new encounters—one with an Austrian baron, Victor, and another with an attractive and compelling art conservator, Maggie—all vie insistently for her affection and love. And what answers do old family behavioral patterns and society’s changing mores provide? And what of betrayal? The events of these six months define and clarify Ann’s quest. Her journey also challenges readers to question their own definitions. Finally, the novel’s probing, evocative, and elusive style both delights and informs.” —Mary Emily Kitterman, former Dean of Faculty and Vice President, Academic Affairs, Cottey College

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